Sunday, 7 August 2011

Sunday safari

We took the parents out for brunch today.    We sat by the river.
Himalayan balsam was very much in evidence.   I do hope they keep an eye on it, as it will take over and crowd out native wildflowers. 
It is lovely to see so many swans.
I thought of my friend across the pond.  
 When I visited my blogging friends last year I came home with thoughts of bringing a little bit of prairie to my garden.    I knew I would have to be careful as I wanted to keep my 'English cottage garden' type planting.   So I decided to have mixed planting.
 The borders either side of the pond are the result.     Ribbon grass, prairie plants, native wildflowers and perennials come together.      This planting is about friendship.......a reminder of the time I spent with very special people.    Not all the plantings are in flower yet, there are many waiting in the wings.   Let me show you just a few.........
Butterfly weed.....grown from seeds from Rose.    My absolute favourite.   I love this plant and cannot wait for butterflies to visit.
Black-eyed Susan.
Verbena Bonariensis alongside butterfly weed....the perfect couple.
Liatris....love the white.
English lavender....it just had to be there.
Bistort, one of my favourite native wildflowers.
Corn marigold and native marsh mallow.
 Now this has me foxed.   I did not plant this pretty little bloom.     Any ideas please?
Looks like some sort of Dianthus to me.


Happy Sunday safari.

13 comments:

  1. Your little slice of the prairie has come along beautifully. That tall grass with the blooming plants really makes it look real. Love seeing the swans. They look so elegant with their wings held aloft. I hope your parents enjoyed their visit by the river. It looks like so much fun with the boats moored along the sides. The water looks so peaceful. Happy Sunday Safari.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Lisa,

    I am sure my 'mini prairie' will change each year. I shall add to it as time passes.

    The parents had a lovely time. We know the owners of the restaurant, they are very dear friends. They have known Mum and Dan and ma in law for many years. They spoil them a little.......which is so nice.
    Dad had a fall, which was worrying. Nothing broken, but he is bruised....bless him.

    ReplyDelete
  3. HI Cheryl...Lovely looking place for lunch!!
    The H.Balsam is just like ours except ours is orange...a invasive plant for sure..but as kids .."well I must admit I still do" ..we loved popping the seed pods!! : }}
    The Prairie garden is lovely and sentimental!!
    That little red flower is so cute ,and I think your right on the Dianthus!!

    Long rainy Sunday here...
    Grace!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Dear Cheryl, Your English Prairie Cottage garden is beautiful. I do love a garden filled with passalongs and plants that remind me of friends and loved ones...I love asclepias and the one from Rose is a beauty. I can't wait to see the butterfly that visit it. Have a sweet week~xogail

    ReplyDelete
  5. Dear Cheryl,
    Seeing a bit of Prairie in your garden made my day!
    I cannot seem to get Black Eyed Susans to flourish for me. After just a year or two they are gone. Wonderful seeing them in your border.
    The Swans are gorgeous.....I have a very special place in my heart for Swans.
    Sending healing salve to your Dad. Falling is scary.
    Delightful brunch spot. Spoiling the Elders is good.....
    Have a happy week,
    Happy Sunday Safari.
    Sherry

    ReplyDelete
  6. Glad you had such a wonderful day your flowers are perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'm so happy to see your mini-prairie, Cheryl! I'm glad the butterfly weed is doing so well for you. They are slow-starters, but once they get going, they really fill out. It touches me to think there is a little bit of prairie in the heart of the English countryside; I think of it as a symbol of the friendship we have. It's funny, too, that while you are creating a little prairie, my goal has always been to have an English cottage-style garden:)

    As for the mystery flower, it could have been part of a mixed seed collection we sent. It does look like a dianthus, although if it turns to a wispy gray seedhead, it could be a geum.

    Sorry to hear about your Dad's fall; I hope all is well. A beautiful place to take them for lunch! I'm off to Oregon tomorrow to help Daughter move back home--we'll be seeing a lot of open country on our way back. Take care.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Grace,

    Didn't the carpenters sing about rainy days and Sundays?

    Himalayan Balsam has become a bit of a problem here. It is swamping out riverbanks and wildflowers.....

    ReplyDelete
  9. I agree Gail. My garden is full of wonderful memories and travels. How could I ever leave it :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. Dear Sherry,

    Black Eyed Susan has taken a while to like this garden. I think at last she is in the right place and will stay a while (hopefully).

    I thought of you most of the time when I was with the swans. They are such graceful creatures.

    Dad is bruised but ok.....He tells me not to worry but I do. I could see that he was going to fall down the steps (concrete) but I could not hold his weight. I tried......and I think I saved him knocking his head.

    Have a lovely week and tku for caring.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Dear Rose,

    Tku for your kind words re Dad. Also tku for the info re mystery plant. It is just so pretty. I shall collect seeds.

    I hope you have some success with your English cottage style garden. They are easy, if you like random planting....nothing is orderly in a cottage garden, it has a mind of it's own :)

    I found it difficult to get the prairie look.....it is just so unique. I must say though it is a really pretty area and holds sweet memories for me. I have noted many bees in this area, which is wonderful.

    Safe journey and have fun with daughter.....

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hi Cheryl,
    I love the pictures of the swans, they are such amazing creatures aren't they!
    Bistort was a new discovery for me last year and I have it in my garden for the first time now. I was introduced to it by one of my herbal teachers. It is a great astringent remedy and beautiful too.
    Your prairie border looks so lovely and graceful.
    Take good care,
    Lucinda
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  13. How lovely to have a little bit of prairie in your garden! I love the black-eyed susans, but I don't seem to be able to grow them very well.

    Nice place to have brunch. I'm sure the parents enjoyed that. The water looks so serene.

    Swans are beautiful. I don't see many where I am, but where my son lives (in Ottawa ) there are plenty on the river.

    ReplyDelete

Note: only a member of this blog may post a comment.